Fake news

Imagine being limited to 10 buildings for the rest of your life.

Because of my severe reactions to fragrances and other odors, I can’t go to shopping malls or movie theaters. No concerts, bars, or sport events. I’m afraid to take vacations, because the last two out of three times I ended up hospitalized. Aside from the days I’m pumped full of prednisone, my life is contained to about 10 buildings I can safely breathe in.

For me, the hardest loss is eating out. I hate cooking and I miss socializing with friends. My diet is so restricted (low histamine, low FODMAP, and soy free) that even if I could breathe inside a restaurant, I wouldn’t be able to eat or drink anything. I can’t even drink the water.

Well, there is one exception: an allergy-friendly, burger joint with high-quality ingredients, disability parking, high ceilings, and good airflow. Although I have to premedicate and I still have mild reactions, I enjoy a juicy cheeseburger on special occasions.

Recently, I scheduled an office lunch at the restaurant to celebrate our interns. Although I certainly didn’t have to, I like to regularly remind everyone I am an excellent boss and a charming coworker. Food has way of connecting people, unlike my plastic-wrapped, HEPA filtered office with no windows and a locked door.

I snagged a corner seat at the end of a long table for maximum airflow. My service dog curled up underneath, while I popped a Benadryl and set my Fiji Water on a coaster. My coworkers and I ordered our food and began our pleasantries. I rarely see my coworkers ever since HR put me in solitary confinement. Still it’s really hard to give a shit about polite conversation when you’re constantly facing life-threatening situations. It’s even harder to offer relatable conversation when your personal life consists of Facebook, poodles, and texts from your neighbor checking if you’re alive.

My head bobbed as a tried to find a smooth entry into the conversation, like a game of Double Dutch. Don’t mention anything medical, especially not your CSF leak. Lately, everything seems unequivocally related to CSF leaks. “That sounds so fun. I’d love to try that… but my brain might hemorrhage out my ear!”

My focus was interrupted by a man approaching the end of table. He knelt down and began assembling a tripod. When he stood up again, I recognized him as a local reporter. My curiosity was interrupted as the waitress thrust a plump burger oozing with cheese in front of me. I grabbed the steaming tower of beef with both hands and inhaled the greasy goodness.

“Oh my god, why are they filming us?” a coworker exclaimed. Sure enough, the reporter was now hidden behind a lens pointed directly down the center of our table. My coworkers squirmed, trying to hide their faces, while sneaking bites of beef.

I snickered at their self-consciousness. I don’t worry about looking good anymore. Prednisone cured me of my vanity. I’m too busy convincing people of my disabilities, so I can get help. I’m constantly reminding everyone that I rarely leave the house and struggle with simple errands like oil changes and phone repairs.

In fact, I generally look pretty good considering how I feel. Here I was wearing a dress, flaunting perfect curls, and eating lunch with seven other people. Aside from the poodle hidden under the table, no one could tell I was disabled. Let the paparazzi get their shots.

I figured the reporter was collecting some b-roll for its evening newscast. Some friends and family would probably see it. They would be proud of me for appearing in public like a normal human being.

Or would they.

I turned my face away from the camera.

What if they see this and think I’m a liar? What if they suspect I eat restaurant food all time? What if they think these people are my friends and I’m having a great time? What if they think I lied about everything and no one ever wants to help me again?

I finished my burger, hoping it would push the paranoia out of my stomach. Instead, my nausea grew as I drove my coworkers back the office, a typical post-meal histamine reaction. I left work early that day due burger-induced cramps and fatigue. I spent the evening curled on my couch, waiting for the news, and preparing my rebuttal.

4 thoughts on “Fake news

  1. good for you getting out and doing your very best to enjoy yourself! i sincerely hate it that those of us with chronic illness feel bad/ashamed/defensive when we bust our butt to try to live some sliver of a normal life.
    said a prayer that you will feel “better” sooner rather than later……..bless you!

    Liked by 1 person

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