The soup that helps me survive winter

I have never enjoyed cooking food. Maybe it’s because most food hurts me. Maybe it’s because standing in the kitchen makes me dizzy and exhausted. Maybe it’s because during my first cooking lesson, my mother told me that my great grandmother died in a cooking fire.

However, my body demands home cooked meals. Soy, garlic, onion, corn syrup, lactose, and high-fiber foods make me feel like I’ve swallowed a demon. High histamine foods, basically all the remaining foods, make me puke within 20 minutes of ingestion. It’s easier to explain what I can eat: fresh, plain meat; potatoes; rice; bread; and butter.

This makes lunch at work incredibly difficult. I cannot breathe in restaurants, and there are no safe takeout foods. I cannot eat refrigerated food, which increases histamine, but frozen is okay.

My friend encouraged me to make soup, which sounded tasty. However, when I learned her recipe involves roasting a chicken and simmer the bones, I abandoned the idea. The only thing I roast are bad healthcare providers.

I don’t appreciate food enough to spend hours of my precious energy preparing it. I often remind myself that in the event of a zombie apocalypse I will die because I don’t know how to roast a squirrel. But let’s be honest, I probably can’t catch a squirrel and I’d probably die from running out of my medications first. I’d be lucky if I lived long enough for a zombie to eat me.

This year, when Minnesota’s windchill dropped to -50F, my body demanded soup. I scoured Whole Foods for a gastronomic compromise. To my delight, I discovered the nectar I’d been longing for: a chicken broth made without garlic or onions. From then on, it was surprisingly easy to develop low-energy soup recipes.

Here’s my recipe for chicken noodle soup:

  1. Think about making chicken noodle soup. Eat air sandwiches for lunch and sleep through dinner time until you are so hungry that you can’t feel your joint pain anymore.
  2. Eat cereal for energy to go to the store.
  3. Go to Whole Foods at 5 pm, because that’s when the rotisserie chickens are fresh. Buy one plain rotisserie chicken, celery, carrots, green onions, and 48 oz of 365 Everyday Value® Organic Chicken Broth. Pray that you still have basil, thyme, and pasta at home.
  4. Eat part of the chicken and take a nap.
  5. Maim the celery and carrots. I hate celery and carrots. They taste shit and aren’t going to cure me. But I eat them just in case.
  6. Sauté the vegetables in garlic oil if you feel fancy.
  7. Squirt the box of chicken broth into a pot over the vegetables, emulating the sights and sounds of colonoscopy prep. This is my favorite part.
  8. Dump basil, thyme, and pepper into the pot until it looks pretty and bring the broth to a boil.
  9. Add 2 cups of tri-color rotini because curls have more fun. Boil for 7 minutes.
  10. Remove from heat, add chopped chicken and green onions, and stir until you get tired or bored.
  11. Spoon into Pyrex bowls and freeze.
  12. Tell the poodles to do the dishes.

Candy WAS dandy

“Are you sure you don’t want to come with us?” my mom asked, standing in my bedroom doorway, alongside a petite, but bloody vampire.

“Nah,” I said, barely looking up from my book. I was thirteen, officially too old to tour the neighborhood with my mom and little brother, and all of my friends had retired from trick-or-treating.

As soon I heard the door slam, I dropped my book and sprinted to the living room window. Behind the curtain, I watched them turn right at the end of the driveway and disappear into the darkness. The silence of the house filled me with anticipation.

Back in my bedroom, I changed my clothes: black leggings and a black sweatshirt. I ripped the pillowcase off my pillow, grabbed the cat mask I had dug out of storage a few hours earlier, and laced up my running shoes. I snuck out the front door, undetected by my dad. At the end of the driveway, I turned left and burst into a full sprint.

The purpose of Halloween is candy. It’s not about visiting with your neighbors, or spending time with your friends; it’s about collecting the most candy. That year, I decided I was going to collect the most candy ever. Goodbye pokey family and doorstep chitchats. My mask would give me the anonymity I needed to speed up my hustle. I did not walk door to door. I ran.

I ran like a thief in night. Literally. I took more than my fair share of those unattended bowls of candy left on doorsteps. I learned to time my approaches perfectly, sliding into other groups just as the homeowner opened their door and the kids held out their bags. I rarely had to press the doorbell and wait. Sometimes I didn’t even say trick-or-treat.

Only the weight of the pillowcase could stop me. I returned home cradling my 20-pound pillowcase in both arms. I dumped its contents on my bed, admired the assortment, and congratulated myself. I rewarded myself with my favorite kinds first, but it didn’t really matter. I was going to eat it all anyway. It was just a matter of time.

Thirty minutes later, my mom and brother returned home. When my mom opened my bedroom door to tell me how I had missed out, she found me grinning wickedly surrounded by wrappers.

******

Skittles were one of my favorite candies. Particularly the purple Skittles. I think I started buying them from the office vending machine to try to beat the afternoon slump. This was four years ago, when my digestive issues were beginning to get severe. I was avoiding dairy and soy, so Starbucks was no longer an option. I had cut out gluten, and was resorting to all fruit smoothies for lunch, but my gut and butt were still angry.

A bag of Skittles seemed harmless given my current state. At least it would help my mental health, I justified. I spread the tiny spheres out on my desk, admiring their bright colors, as if it would slow my consumption. As soon as they were gone, I wanted more. My coworker caught me with the second bag and warned me I was going to be sorry. Maybe, I said, but I was going to be happy first.

One hour later, the Skittles started punching me in the stomach. I continued to work at my desk, accepting my punishment and accustomed to digestive pain. Suddenly, a sharp, overwhelming urge rushed me to the bathroom. I pooped the entire rainbow for the next 30 minutes.

If you know me well, you know this did not discourage me. In fact, they next day, I ate two more bags of Skittles and again, pooped my guts out. I wasn’t surprised by my belly ache, but the ferocity of the Skittles shooting through my system was terrifying.

I googled my symptoms and discovered fructose intolerance. People with fructose intolerance can’t digest foods like corn syrup, which is in everything! I refused to believe I could no longer eat my beloved candy, so I keep eating the Skittles for a full week. I spent a lot of time in the bathroom that week.

Eventually, I realized not only were the Skittles making me sick, but my lunchtime smoothies too! I thought all fruit smoothies were the ultimate health food, but I was wrong. It turns out a lot of supposed healthy foods make me sick. Soon after, I discovered the low FODMAP diet and have stuck with it ever since. My hypothesis is mast cell disease destroyed my body’s ability to create many enzymes necessary for digestion.

Now I binge on corn syrup free jelly beans. Sometimes by the package. You can take the fructose out of the candy, but you can’t take the candy out of me.